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Stop Snoring With a CPAP Machine

Stop Snoring With a CPAP Machine
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People often wonder, isn’t there some type of snoring device — or, actually, an anti-snoring device — that could help me (or my partner) get a good night’s sleep?

The answer is yes.  Like most things these days, snoring devices aren’t guaranteed to work for everyone. Much depends on the precise cause of the snoring.  But, once that’s been determined, help awaits.

Continuous Positive Airway Pressure, commonly called CPAP, is considered the most effective nonsurgical therapy (in other words, snoring device) to combat snoring and obstructive sleep apnea.

How CPAP Machine Works

A safe and painless treatment, CPAP uses mild air pressure to keep airways open while you sleep. It’s meant to be used every night. CPAP equipment includes a mask or other device that fits over the nose or over both the nose and mouth. The mask, which is held in place by straps, is attached to a tube that’s connected to a motor that produces the air pressure. You can check detailed CPAP machine reviews at the linked site.

CPAP units are small and lightweight and produce a fairly soft, rhythmic sound, according to the U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

Other than among people with severe nasal obstruction, CPAP has been found to be 100 percent effective in eliminating snoring and sleep apnea when used correctly. But long-term compliance is about 70 percent, according to some studies. That’s because some people become claustrophobic when using the mask or find that CPAP is difficult to use when traveling.

Is CPAP for You?

cpap machine
CPAP Machine

To determine if CPAP might be right for you, your doctor will review your medical history, lifestyle (such things as use of alcohol and tobacco, as well as exercise habits), cardiovascular health and current medications. You’ll also undergo an ear, nose and throat examination to evaluate your airway, says the American Academy of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery.

Also, before you can begin using CPAP at home, the proper air pressure has to be determined during a sleep study.

Adjusting to using CPAP might take a while. As some users have said, at first it feels strange to wear a mask at night or to feel the flow of air. This is similar to what a stop snoring mouthpiece such as Pure Sleep feels.

Taking time to get used to the mask might help. Begin by holding the mask on your face for short periods during the day. Then try wearing it with the straps. Next, add the hose. Once you’re comfortable with this, try using at night while you sleep.

Others have found that relaxation exercises can help while you’re trying to adapt to the CPAP paraphernalia.

FURTHER READING: 

Pure Sleep Reviews

CPAP Machine ResMed

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